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I am currently in the process of migrating the content shared here to a series of new websites hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com.

As you explore this site, you may find links to a "page not found" instead of something cool and magickal. For this I apologize. I am very working hard behind the scenes to restore those pages along with a link to their homes on my new website where they can be viewed in full.

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Tuesday, August 31, 2010

62 Spells To Defeat Your Enemies

I found these old old spells to protect oneself from enemies in a cool old book printed back in 1903. This section reads more like a short primer on black magick, and I'd advise against creating a lot of bad karma for yourself by trying these out on actual people. I do, however, think that it might be interesting to try using them on noncorporeal enemies such as: procrastination, poverty, racism, addictions, etc.

However you choose to use them, be wise and be warned. "If you wish evil to someone, the evil will come to you." That being said, here they are:

  1. If you tie knots in the willow, you can slay a distant enemy.

  2. If you would bring your enemy to death, pour poison in his footprints....
... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Book of Shadows, and can be found in its entirety here: 62 Spells To Defeat Your Enemies

Monday, August 30, 2010

Need A Reason to Stay in Bed?


Here's a listing of the "Fatal Days" of the year -
if today is one of those days, maybe you should just stay in bed!

January.
Of this first month the opening day
And seventh, like a sword will slay.

February.
The fourth day bringeth down to death,
The third will stop a strong man's breath.

March.
The first the greedy glutton slays,
The fourth cuts short the drunkard's days.

April.
The tenth and the eleventh too,
Are ready death's fell 'work to do.

May.
The third to slay poor man hath power.
The seventh destroyeth in an hour.

June.
The tenth a pallid visage shows,
No faith nor truth the fifteenth knows.

July.
The thirteenth is a fatal day,
The tenth alike will mortals slay.

August.
The first kills strong ones at a blow.
The second lays a cohort low.

September.
The third day of the month September
And tenth bring evil to each member.

October.
The third and tenth with poisoned breath
To men are foes as foul as death.

November.
The fifth bears stings of deadly pain,
The third is in destruction's train.

December.
The seventh is a fatal day for human life,
The tenth is with a serpent's venom rife.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Having A Bad Day?


Grab your calendar and mark the days!
Here we have a list of the 56 Unfortunate days of the year:

January:
7 days: 3, 4, 6, 13, 14, 20, 21.

February:
7 days: 3, 7, 9, 12, 16, 17, 23.

March:
8 days: 1, 2, 5, 8, 12, 16, 28, 29.

April:
2 days: 24, 25.

May:
5 days: 17, 20, 27, 29, 30.

June:
8 days: 1, 5, 6, 9, 12, 16, 18, 24.

July:
4 days: 3, 10, 17, 18.

August:
2 days: 15, 20.

September:
2 days: 9, 16.

October:
6 days: 4, 9, 11, 17, 27, 31.

November:
4 days: 3, 9, 10, 21.

December:
2 days: 14, 21.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Is Today Your Lucky Day?


Grab your calendar and mark the days!
What we have here is a list of the 53 Fortunate days of the year:

January:
6 days: 1, 2, 15, 26, 27 and 28.

February:
4 days: 11, 21, 25, 26.

March:
2 days: 10, 24.

April:
5 days: 6, 15, 16, 20, 28.

May:
3 days: 3, 18, 31.

June:
5 days: 10, 11, 15, 22, 25.

July:
3 days: 9, 15, 28.

August:
6 days: 6, 7, 10, 11, 19, 25.

September:
5 days: 4, 8, 17, 18, 23.

October:
5 days: 3, 7, 16, 21, 22.

November:
3 days: 5, 14, 20.

December:
6 days: 15, 19, 20, 22, 23, 25.

Found in:
Encyclopaedia of Superstitions, Folklore, and the Occult Sciences

Friday, August 27, 2010

Make A Voodoo Doll Out Of Anything!

This is the first in a series of videos by Planet Voodoo on how to make a Voodoo doll out of absolutely anything. In this episode, Voodoo Mama takes you on a hunt for junk in some barns and show you how to make a guardian Ju Ju using all salvaged items. It's Voodoo Gone Green, y'all.

How To Make A Voodoo Doll



Here's a trippy little movie conjured up by Planet Voodoo showing how to make your very own New Orleans-style Voodoo Hoodoo doll.

Make A Money Dollie


Cut out the shape you desire from green flannel: the doll could be a person, an elephant, a leprechaun, mermaid, or whatever you envision.

Stuff it with dillweed and Irish moss, then sew it up and embellish it as desired.

Talk to the doll; tell it your troubles and request advice before you go to sleep. Pay attention to your dreams.

Source: Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Magickal Uses of Corn


Corn aka maize, is the seed of seeds. Key words associated with corn magick are: Sacred Mother, Protection, Luck, Divination.

Corn represents fertility and is used to invoke Mother Earth. Used at Mabon and Lammas in ritual, it teaches the mystery of life, death, and rebirth. Many cultures gave corn, which is regarded as a food of prosperity, protection, and spirituality, a special god or goddess of its own.
  • Eat yellow corn on the summer solstice for blessings and prosperity.
  • Consume white corn for spiritual insight.
  • Scatter blue corn meal to purify and bless a space.
  • Hang red corn above doorways at harvest time to protect rewards that have been reaped.
  • Corn on the cob represents the phallic gods and draws creative or sexual energy.
  • Financial or love wishes that are shouted out as popcorn is popping will come true.
  • Cornsilk is a very powerful ingredient when added to love spells; it is designed to attract the person you desire.
From: Encyclopedia of Magickal Ingredients

The Golden Corn


"Now o friends
Listen to the words of a dream
Each spring brings us new life
The golden corn refreshes us
And the pink corn makes us a necklace
...At least this we know:
The hearts of our friends are true."

- Aztec

Monday, August 02, 2010

Sunday, August 01, 2010

August Moon Names

What follows is a list (in alphabetical order) of the names given to the August moon. Also listed is the tradition and/or origin of that moon name:


Acorns Ripen Moon ~Maidu
Autumn Moon ~Taos
Barley Moon ~other
Berry Moon ~Anishnaabe
Big Harvest Moon ~Creek
Big Ripening Moon ~Creek...

... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar, and can be found in its entirety here: August Moon Names

Honoring The Past


In our modern world, it's often easy to forget the trials and tribulations our ancestors had to endure. For us, if we need a loaf of bread, we simply drive over to the local grocery store and buy a few bags of prepackaged bread. If we run out, it's no big deal, we just go and get more. When our ancestors lived, hundreds and thousands of years ago, the harvesting and processing of grain was crucial. If crops were left in the fields too long, or the bread not baked in time, families could starve. Taking care of one's crops meant the difference between life and death.

By celebrating Lammas as a harvest holiday, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they must have had to do in order to survive. This is a good time to give thanks for the abundance we have in our lives, and to be grateful for the food on our tables. Lammas is a time of transformation, of rebirth and new beginnings.

Symbols of the Season

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more, and you may feel like decorating your house accordingly. While you probably can't find too many items marked as "Lammas decor" in your local discount store, there are a number of items you can use as decoration for this harvest holiday.
  • Sickles and scythes, as well as other symbols of harvesting
  • Grapes and vines
  • Dried grains -- sheafs of wheat, bowls of oats, etc.
  • Corn dolls -- you can make these easily using dried husks
  • Early fall vegetables, such as squashes and pumpkins
  • Late summer fruits, like apples, plums and peaches
Crafts, Song and Celebration
Because of its association with Lugh, the skilled god, Lammas (Lughnasadh) is also a time to celebrate talents and craftsmanship. It's a traditional time of year for craft festivals, and for skilled artisans to peddle their wares. In medieval Europe, guilds would arrange for their members to set up booths around a village green, festooned with bright ribbons and fall colors. Perhaps this is why so many modern Renaissance Festivals begin around this time of year!

Lugh is also known in some traditions as the patron of bards and magicians. Now is a great time of year to work on honing your own talents. Learn a new craft, or get better at an old one. Put on a play, write a story or poem, take up a musical instrument, or sing a song. Whatever you choose to do, this is the right season for rebirth and renewal, so set today (August 1) as the day to share your new skill with your friends and family.

Warrior Meditation for Lughnasadh

At Lammas (or Lughnasadh), the harvest is kicking in. This is a time of year when the masculine energy of the earth is in full swing. For starters, it's the season of the spirit of grain, and a time to honor Lugh, the craftsman god. Lugh was not only a craftsman, but a gifted smith and swordsman. The season from late summer to the middle of fall is often a season of heightened energy for those who identify with the warrior soul.



Who Is the Warrior?
The warrior in today's society is someone who understands the idea of right action. He or she follows a code of honor, and abides by that code even when it may be inconvenient or unpopular. The warrior recognizes that the forces of creation and destruction must be balanced...

... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website, Meditation, and can be found in its entirety here: Warrior Meditation

Lammas - A Feast of Bread

In early Ireland, it was a bad idea to harvest your grain any time before Lammas -- it meant that the previous year's harvest had run out early, and that was a serious failing in agricultural communities. However, on August 1, the first sheafs of grain were cut by the farmer, and by nightfall his wife had made the first loaves of bread of the season.

The word Lammas derives from the Old English phrase hlaf-maesse, which translates to loaf mass. In early Christian times, the first loaves of the season were blessed by the Church...

... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been divided into two separate posts, and moved to my new website, The Pagan Calendar. They can be found here: Lammas - A Feast of Bread, and here: Lammas Bread

Campfire Bread

Ingredients:
  • 8 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 tablespoons butter or shortening
  • 1 cup of milk
Method:

Combine the flour, baking powder... I am so sorry to do this to you, but this post has been moved to my new website Gypsy Magick and Lore (hosted at shirleytwofeathers.com) and can be found in its entirety here: Campfire Bread
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